Miscellany

scruffyshezza:

We're not the same! I'm not... No, wait. Maybe we are [...]
I know what you deserve. Exterminate.

for kinusking

strikerhercules:

» Because only Vin Diesel could ever be ridiculously nerdy enough to attend the UK world premiere red carpet for Guardians of the Galaxy wearing a “I am Groot” t-shirt and walking on stilts

mockingjalie:

The Mockingjay lives!

alliecat-person:

worldwithinworld:

dearestfandoms:

officialggf:

We took this quiz- Marie and Mandy both got Gilbert Blythe. Interesting…. Let us know what you get!

Anne! (:

I’m Diana Barry, it says. “Diana Barry” is one of my dad’s nicknames for me, which I always thought was just because we have the same first name, but I guess we have more in common than I thought.

Anne. Not a surprise.

Gilbert Blythe.  I’m not really sure how I pulled that off, especially with:

You can easily be the life of the party with your amiable personality and clever remarks.

Yeah, no.

If I said to you, "Katniss Everdeen is the Rosa Parks of Panem," would you know what I meant? Would you, per chance, have any thoughts?

stoneridgehouse:

peetasallhehasleft:

If by that do you mean she took a stand against oppression?  I both do and don’t agree with that.

It’s long so I’m putting it under the cut, read it if you want.

As an fyi, there are Mockingjay spoilers, so don’t read if you don’t want to know them.

Read More

I agree with you in regard to that perspective of Rosa Parks. Believe me when I say I’m not trying to be flippant, especially because THG is a fictional trilogy and what Rosa Parks did was real life. But whenever I have this thought (that Katniss is the Rosa Parks of Panem) what I’m thinking of is this: before Ms. Parks took a stand, there was already a rebellion going on but that rebellion needed a symbol, a person they could use as a catalyst and as a rallying point. Before Rosa, there were others who were recruited for “the job” of refusing to give up their seat, but for one reason or another these others did not prove as successful as Rosa Parks in terms of being the “mockingjay” of the civil rights movement. The movement spent decades looking for someone worthy of this role, someone whose character could stand up in a court of law, someone proponents of civil rights could connect with and opponents would even be hard pressed to wish ill. Of course it wasn’t Ms. Parks’ suit that eventually desegregated the buses in Montgomery but it was Ms. Parks who unified the rebellion movement, energized it, and even converted opponents. What I’m really thinking about when I have this thought is not about Katniss at all, but about what the rebellion was like while underground, while it was waiting and searching for that one tribute whose character, survival skills, and circumstances, (and sure even good looks and tragic love story why not), could be used to create this undeniable symbol, this rallying point they needed to rally the districts together and give D13 the confidence to reveal themselves. How many times before Katniss came along did the rebellion think they’d found The One?

My first viewing of Deathly Hallows had to wait until it was available On Demand b/c of pregnancy. So I was SO excited to be finally watching it until the movie started and I realized, "Oh no. HEDWIG." So even before the action leaves Malfoy Manor, I got all tense and wide eyed and so still. When Hedwig died, I just deflated. That was the first and only time I cried throughout the whole series (book and film). Her death just killed me. And now I'm crying again. *not really, but really*

It’s kind of amazing how rattled I was by Hedwig’s death…I mean, I’ve read about Rowling’s motivations for killing her, but I’m still just “lalala…they never found a body so OF COURSE Hedwig pulls a Buttercup and shows up after all is said and done.” 

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While many authors deserve the credit for the recent renaissance of young adult and middle grade fiction, there’s one in particular who was a catalytic force in propelling literature for children into the larger sphere, driving millions of readers to bookstores, and sparking a massive, global movement of fans. Earlier books on quirky, sweet, delightful subjects gave way to progressively darker ones that still retained a characteristic whimsy and sense of humor, and this author’s fame only grew with each title. The author’s public appearances were greeted by thousands of screaming fans, and the books led to movie adaptations and to a whole new fandom.

You might thinking I’m talking about John Green, the current media darling, who’s been repeatedly credited with making YA mainstream, but, actually, I’m not. I’m talking about J.K. Rowling and the Harry Potter series, which weren’t just groundbreaking and didn’t just inspire a new revival in children’s literature. They shaped an entire generation.

Last night John Green received MTV’s Fandom “Visionary” award. Today, Daily Dot guest columnist S.E. Smith speaks out about the John Green Effect

[READ MORE]

(via dailydot)

isaadlahey:

Honest Trailers - Divergent (x)

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soldierboggs:

the hunger games fandom may hate each other but we hate lionsgate more 

nymphadoralupin:

i think you can tell a lot about a person by which harry potter death caused them the most pain

maxkirin:

Neil Gaiman’s 8 Rules of Writing, a remake of this post. Source.

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